Instant Pot Spicy Dumpling Soup

If you’re a lover of spicy (perhaps fiery) Asian dishes and soups alike, you’ve just met your new best friend. When my partner Richard and I were visiting my friend Drew in Vancouver in 2019, he took us to this amazing dumpling house that’s since closed. They had the most AMAZING spicy dumpling soup there and I still talk about it. Perfect for those chilly months, this soup also clears up your sinuses! Now, this is definitely a spicier soup BUT in Jeff’s Tips in the recipe card below, I specify how to cut down on it or omit it completely (as well as a few other key tips you’ll want to pay attention to).

Spicy Dumpling Soup
Adding chili oil to pot
Like my Dan Dan Noodles, this dish is meant to be spicy! So, of course we’ll begin by adding some chili oil to the pot and heat it up.
Adding sliced shiitake mushrooms to pot
Then, toss in some sliced mushrooms (I like shiitake)…
Adding crushed ginger to pot
…and some crushed, minced or Squeeze Ginger
Sautéing mushrooms
…and sauté.
Adding rice vinegar to pot
After a few minutes, add in some rice vinegar.
Deglazing pot
Not only does it add a perfect slightly sour twang to the soup, but it will also get all of the browned bits from the pot up. Be sure to deglaze so the bottom is nice and smooth.
Adding broth to pot
Pour some vegetable broth in to the pot…
Adding white pepper and soy sauce to pot
…followed by some white pepper and soy sauce.
Adding bamboo shoots to pot
I also love adding bamboo shoots for a wonderful texture!
Adding frozen wontons to pot
And then, of course, add in some frozen dumplings or wontons with fillings of your choice (NOTE: see Jeff’s Tips section on this in the recipe card at the bottom of the page).
Stirring pot
Give everything a good stir.
Topping pot with spinach
Top with spinach. Secure the lid and cook at high pressure.
Stirring cooked soup
When done, give the pot a stir.
Adding cornstatch slurry to pot
Bring the pot to a bubble and stir in a cornstarch slurry to thicken the soup (NOTE: see Jeff’s Tips section on this in the recipe card at the bottom of the page).
Adding hoisin sauce to pot
For a sweet touch, add in some hoisin sauce.
Adding sesame oil to pot
…and a nice, toasty touch of sesame oil.
Adding chili garlic sauce to pot
To really send the spice home, add in some chili garlic sauce or sriracha…
Adding more chili oil to pot
…and more chili oil! (again, see Jeff’s Tips section on this in the recipe card at the bottom of the page about controlling the spice factor).
Adding sliced scallions to pot
Finish it off with some sliced scallions…
Adding white and black sesame seeds to pot
…and sesame seeds (I use a mix of black and white)
Stirring pot
Give it all a final stir…
Soup in a bowl
…and ladle into bowls.
Man holding soup bowl
Just look at this stunningly spicy soup!
Man trying soup
Now give it a slurp…
Man looking stunned
Embrace the heat…
Man smiling
…and clear up those sinuses while warming your soul in no time at all! Spicy Dumpling Soup saves the day!
Instant Pot Spicy Dumpling Soup
Yield: 6

Instant Pot Spicy Dumpling Soup

Instant Pot Spicy Dumpling Soup

If you're a lover of spicy (perhaps fiery) Asian dishes and soups alike, you've just met your new best friend. When my partner Richard and I were visiting my friend Drew in Vancouver in 2019, he took us to this amazing dumpling house that's since closed. They had the most AMAZING spicy dumpling soup there and I still talk about it. Perfect for those chilly months, this soup also clears up your sinuses! Now, this is definitely a spicier soup BUT in Jeff's Tips, I specify how to cut down on it or omit it completely (as well as a few other key tips you'll want to pay attention to).

Prep Time 10 minutes
Cook Time 1 minute
Additional Time 8 minutes
Total Time 19 minutes

Ingredients

Instructions

    NOTE: READ JEFF'S TIPS BEFORE BEGINNING THIS RECIPE FOR SPICE ADJUSTMENTS!

  1. Add 1/4 cup of the chili oil to the Instant Pot. Hit Sauté and Adjust so it's on the More or High Setting. After 3 minutes of heating, add the mushrooms and ginger and sauté for 3 minutes.
  2. Add the rice vinegar and be sure to deglaze all the sticky browned bits caused by the mushrooms. Follow with the broth, soy sauce, white pepper (if using), bamboo shoots (if using) and frozen wontons or dumplings (See Jeff's Tips). Top with the spinach but do not stir. Secure the lid, hit Cancel and then hit Pressure Cook or Manual at High Pressure for 1 minute. Quick release when done.
  3. Meanwhile, mix together the cornstarch and water to form a slurry. Hit Cancel followed by Sauté and Adjust so it's on the More or High Setting. Once bubbling, stir in the slurry for 30 seconds and then kill the heat. The soup will have thickened-up nicely.
  4. Stir in the remaining 1/4 cup of chili oil, chili garlic sauce (or sriracha), sesame oil, hoisin sauce, scallions and sesame seeds.
  5. Ladle into bowls and top with more sesame seeds and scallions, if desired.

Jeffrey's Tips

This recipe, as written, is going to give you a 7-8 out of 10 in terms of spice factor. It is a pretty serious soup and will be the perfect remedy to a cold night or spicy craving! But since that's not everyone's bag, I've provided some options to make this friendly for all!

  • If you don't want this soup spicy at all, leave out the chili oil, white pepper and chili garlic sauce. Instead, up the sesame oil to 6 tablespoons total. Add 4 tablespoons in Step 1 while sautéing the mushrooms and then add the remaining 2 tablespoons in Step 4. 
  • If you still want the soup spicy but prefer it less spicy, we'll reduce the chili oil and chili garlic sauce (or sriracha). Follow Steps 1 and 2 as is but taste the soup after it's done in Step 2. If you feel you want more spice but also have it not be super intense, start with 1 additional tablespoon of the chili oil and 1 tablespoon of the chili garlic sauce (or sriracha). From there, you can continue to add more of each spice by the tablespoon.
  • If you don’t want mushrooms, just leave them out. Skip Step 1 and add the first 1/4 cup of chili oil along with the ginger and rice vinegar in Step 2 with the broth (or, if you don't want it spicy, omit the chili oil, white pepper and chili garlic sauce or sriracha - or follow the previous tip for it to just be less spicy).
  • The 3:3 cornstarch slurry makes for a nice, thick soup as written. But should you wish it to be thinner, you can start with 1-2 tablespoons of a slurry instead.
  • The longer the dumplings/wontons sit in the soup, the more they'll absorb the broth. This won't be an issue if serving the full pot at once. But if you plan on having leftovers, you can always add 1-2 cups more vegetable broth when reheating as well as adding additional chili oil and/or chili garlic sauce to compensate for the additional liquid. To that point, you can also have more control of your broth absorption by adding the exact amount of wontons/dumplings you wish to eat right away and having them bubble with the slurry in Step 3 for about 5 minutes until they're cooked. From there, store the remaining wonton/dumpling-free soup as is for leftovers with no worries about absorption! NOTE: Dumplings or "potstickers" (I hate that term by the way) tend to have thicker skins than wontons and remain pretty firm under pressure. Therefore, if using wontons instead of dumplings, they will likely be quite soft, delicate and melt-in-your-mouth if pressure cooked as written. If you prefer your wontons firmer and more al dente, waiting until adding them in Step 3 for 5 minutes will ensure this. Of course, you can also just boil or pan-fry them in some oil of your choice separately and add them to the soup at the end (if you don't mind the extra pan and work).

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