Instant Pot Franks & Beans Soup

Franks & Beans Soup

Franks & beans are, without questions, a quintessential Americana food right of passage when camping. In fact, sitting around a campfire will welcome some of the best meals one will enjoy. Whether you’re outdoors roughing it in the middle of nowhere or enjoying a fire-cooked meal in a camper with air conditioning (raises hand), these foods with a smoky-flair are pure rustic comfort. Always thinking outside the box, we’re gonna change things up a bit and give those franks & beans the ultimate soup treatment. That’s right – Franks & Beans Soup! (NOTE: If it’s Halloween, call it Frankenbean Soup). Now you can bring the flavors of the campfire right to your own kitchen (or make it while camping if you bring you Instant Pot and have an electrical hookup). Goes great with my garlic bread.

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Frank & Beans Soup

Hot Diggity Dog

Hot dogs
Begin by taking a bunch of hot dogs (see Jeff’s Tips in the recipe card below)…
Hot dogs sliced into 1/4-inch disks
…and slice them into 1/4-inch disks.

Sauté Away

Butter
Go to your Instant Pot and add some butter…
Butter melted in Instant Pot
…and give it some heat. Once melted…
Adding sliced hot dogs to pot and sautéing in butter
…add those sliced hot dogs and sauté for a few minutes until lightly browned and the sliced sides begin to puff out a bit.
Removing sautéed hot dogs with a slotted spoon
Remove the sautéed hot dogs with a slotted spoon…
Placing the hot dogs in a bowl
…and place in a bowl. Set aside for the time being.
Adding onion to pot
You’re going to have plenty of butter and the juices from the sautéed hot dogs (aka “hot dog butter”) remaining in the pot. Add a roughly diced sweet (Vidalia) onion.
Sautéing onion in the remaining hot dog juices and butter.
Sauté the onion until a bit translucent.
Adding broth to pot
Now we’ll add our broth (I use ham broth but you can definitely use beef or vegetable broth)…
Adding tomato sauce to pot
…tomato sauce…
Adding red and white kidney beans to pot
…and a combo of red and white beans from the can that are drained.

Under Pressure

Stirring pot
Give everything a stir, secure the lid and pressure cook!

The Post Pressure-Cooking Treatment

Pressure cooked soup
When done, it’ll look like this. And now it’s time for the glorious (and fun) finishing touches!
Adding maple syrup to soup
Add in some pure maple syrup for a touch of sweetness as franks & beans are known for that…
Adding liquid smoke to soup
…as well as a smoky flair with some liquid smoke
Adding shredded cheese to soup
…and some shredded cheese (I like ma Cheddar-Jack blend).

Lending a Blending

Placing an immersion blender in the pot of soup
And now comes the fun part: the blending! Take an immersion blender (seriously, this affordable appliance is a must-have convenience for any home-made soup lovers)…
Using the immersion blender to purée the soup.
…and blend the soup until it’s puréed into a sweet ‘n smoky, cheesy, and bean-based broth.

The Finishing Touches

Adding more red and white kidney beans to pureed soup
Now since we want this soup to have some body, not only will we have the beans and onions that pressure cooked in the broth now a part of the broth, but we’ll add more beans to keep it super beany!
Adding hot dogs to pureed soup
And of course we can’t forget our franks! Add that back in as well.
Finished soup in ladle
Give it all a stir and there you have it – Franks & Beans Soup!
Soup in bowl
Ladle some into some bowls and serve!

The Taste Test

Man trying soup
Just look at this new culinary campfire classic ready to be devoured indoors.
Man trying soup
Slurp it up…
Man enjoying soup with a thumbs up
…and savor the flavor! Goes great with my garlic bread!
Yield: 6

Instant Pot Franks & Beans Soup

Instant Pot Franks & Beans Soup

Franks & beans are, without questions, a quintessential Americana food right of passage when camping. In fact, sitting around a campfire will welcome some of the best meals one will enjoy. Whether you're outdoors roughing it in the middle of nowhere or enjoying a fire-cooked meal in a camper with air conditioning (raises hand), these foods with a smoky-flair are pure rustic comfort. Always thinking outside the box, we're gonna change things up a bit and give those franks & beans the ultimate soup treatment. That's right - Franks & Beans Soup! (NOTE: If it's Halloween, call it Frankenbean Soup). Now you can bring the flavors of the campfire right to your own kitchen (or make it while camping if you bring you Instant Pot and have an electrical hookup). Goes great with my garlic bread.

Prep Time 15 minutes
Cook Time 4 minutes
Additional Time 6 minutes
Total Time 25 minutes

Ingredients

Instructions

  1. Add the butter to the Instant Pot, hit Sauté and Adjust to the More or High setting. Once the butter's melted, add the sliced hot dogs and sauté for 3-5 minutes until a bit puffy on the sides and browned. Remove the hot dogs to a bowl and set aside.
  2. Add the onion and sauté another 2-3 minutes until translucent.
  3. Add the broth and tomato sauce and stir in 2 cans of the drained red beans and 1 can of the drained white beans and stir well.
  4. Secure the lid, move the valve to the sealing position and hit Manual or Pressure Cook on High Pressure for 4 minutes. Quick release when done.
  5. Add the shredded cheese, maple syrup, liquid smoke. Then, using an immersion blender, blend until pureed.
  6. Add the remaining 3 cans of drained beans (2 white and 1 red) and return the sautéed hot dogs to the soup.
  7. Serve with some crusty garlic bread or cornbread.

Jeffrey's Tips

As for the hot dogs, you can definitely use any variety you wish - be it beef, turkey, or plant-based/vegan! Using plant-based and vegetable broth will keep this soup vegetarian!

And if you have longer, thicker hot dogs to work with, that's fine too (some may even consider this a blessing). In that case, still use between 24-28 ounces but in addition to slicing them into 1/4-inch pieces, I'd quarter them as well to be more bite-sized.

When using canned beans in a recipe, people often ask me if they can use dried ones instead. You CAN, but it will take far longer to cook and absorb a lot of the broth. Therefore, you'd need to add more broth and significantly up the cook time which will all vary on the types of beans you use. In a nutshell, I'd suggest following the recipe as written with canned beans that are drained (and rinsed, if you wish).

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