Instant Pot Beef Wellington Pie

A few months back, I shared a photo of an outrageous Beef Wellington that Richard & I made together. It was to-die-for delicious…and took a bunch of work…and it was pricey.

But a lot of folks wanted the recipe, and understandably so. A Beef Wellington is an English showstopper of a dish. It’s usually a beef tenderloin (chateaubriand) cut of meet wrapped flaky puff pastry crust and held together with a mushroom-shallot-pâté filling. But I knew I could make a more budget-friendly, deconstructed variation with all of that rich flavor, but a fraction of the work – pastry included!

So we’re gonna turn this Beef Wellington into mini puff pastry pies. Get ready for one of the most comforting and satisfying meals your Instant Pot will take you to.

Beef Wellington Pie
Take two large shallots...
Take two large shallots…
...and finely dice 'em up.
…and finely chop ’em up.
Mushrooms
Mushrooms are a key player to a Wellington, so take a bunch of of them…
Finely chopped mushrooms
…and finely chop them too.
Chuck roast
Now a Wellington also usually focuses on a fancy and expensive cut of meat: a beef tenderloin/filet mignon/chateaubriand. We’re not doing that here. Take a classic and well-marbled chuck roast…
Chuck roast diced
…and slice it up into bite-sized pieces.
Adding olive oil to Instant Pot
Go to the Instant Pot, add some olive oil and heat it up.
Adding beef to pot
Once heated, add the beef…
Seared beef.
…and sauté until the edges are lightly browned.
Remove the lightly seared meat to a bowl and set aside.
Remove the lightly seared meat to a bowl and set aside.Remove the lightly seared meat to a bowl and set aside.
Adding olive oil to pot
Add a little more olive oil to the pot…
Adding dice prosciutto to pot
…along with some diced prosciutto. This is totally optional but I add this because a Wellington sometimes has prosciutto wrapping the beef. It also adds a nice salt factor to the dish without having to add any additional.
Cooked prosicutto
Sauté pretty quickly and the prosciutto will begin to brown and crisp.
Adding Worcestershire sauce to pot
As this is an English dish, of course we need to add in some Worcestershire sauce.
Deglazing pot
Once added, it will magically help you to deglaze the bottom of the pot from any browned bits!
Adding mushrooms to pot
Now add in the mushrooms…
Adding shallots to pot
…shallots…
Adding garlic to pot
…and some minced or crushed garlic.
Sautéing veggies
Sauté for a few minutes until the mushrooms brown and simmer in their juices. This is what the French call duxelles (pronounced “dook-sell”).
Adding bourbon to pot
Optionally, add in a little whiskey/bourbon for extra flavor (but you don’t have to).
Adding dried thyme to pot.
Season with some dried thyme…
Whiskey reduction
After a few minutes of simmering, the whisky and liquids will mostly reduce and evaporate.
Adding beef broth to the pot
Pour in some beef broth…
Adding seared meat to the pot
…return the seared meat to the pot…
Nestling meat in the broth.
…and nestle the meat in the broth. Secure the lid and pressure cook
Puff pastry shells and sheets
While the beef is pressure cooking, prepare the puff pastry! I like to use these Pepperidge Farm Puff Pastry Shells found in the frozen section of most markets near the pie crusts. (NOTE: You can also use 1-2 sheets of thawed puff pastry sheets and use a cookie cutter or knife to cut out silver dollar-sized circles.) (DOUBLE NOTE: This recipe isn’t sponsored by Pepperidge Farm, but I have a feeling this recipe will cause their puff pastry products to fly out of the freezers).
Baked puff pastry
Bake the puff pastry according to the package instructions.
pâté
Also, while the beef’s cooking, take some pâté, which is also a pretty common (and rich) key element to a Wellington and let it come to room temperature. For pâté, I generally use a mousse type.
Finished beef
When the beef is done, it’ll look like this. And now it’s time to put on the finishing Wellington touches!
adding dijon to pot
Add in some Dijon mustard (NOTE: you don’t have to and it won’t make the food taste like mustard – just a nice and common touch since the beef in a Wellington is usually brushed with it)…
…along with the pâté. I just drop it in in large spoonfuls so it easily disperses.
Stirring pot so sauce melds
Stir the pot until the pâté melds into the sauce.
Cornstarch
Give the pot some heat and create a cornstarch slurry, which is the most wonderful (an gluten-free) thickening agent. We do this by taking equal parts cornstarch…
Adding water
…and water.
Mixing to form slurry
Mix the two together until a smooth slurry is formed.
Adding slurry to pot
As the pot’s bubbling, add the slurry while stirring constantly.
Finishing Beef Wellington pie filling.
After turning off the heat, the sauce will thicken perfectly into a rich and undeniable Beef Wellington pie filling (or stew).
Filling puff pastry
Gently ladle the filling into the puff pastry shells (or if you cut out rounds in pastry sheets, poke a hole in the top and gently mix around the flaky center so it crumbles to the bottom of the pastry and it’s hollowed out – ready to spoon the filling in).
Finished pies.
And just look at this beautiful and simply made fancy-schmancy dinner! (NOTE: you will have enough filling for at least 24 puff pastry shells – so you can also use thawed puff pastry sheets and cut the dough into 1-inch squares and bake with the shells for additional scooping of the filling).
Man smiling with pie
So you’re gonna be excited when you get to try this one out.
Man eating pie
Bite into that crispy, flaky puff pastry.
Man savoring food.
…and take a moment. You’re about to witness something incredibly magical, so take it in.
Man showing off pie.
Folks, Beef Wellington Pie is all I ever wanted…with a fraction of the work and price of a typical one! Goes perfect with my Aligot or Garlic Mashed Potatoes.
Yield: 6

Instant Pot Beef Wellington Pie

Instant Pot Beef Wellington Pie

A few months back, I shared a photo of an outrageous Beef Wellington that Richard & I made together. It was to-die-for delicious...and took a bunch of work...and it was pricey. So let's do this my way - easy, more budget friendly and just as spectacular, shall we?

Prep Time 15 minutes
Cook Time 40 minutes
Additional Time 15 minutes
Total Time 1 hour 10 minutes

Ingredients

Instructions

  1. Add 2 tablespoons of the olive oil to the Instant Pot, hit Sauté and Adjust so it’s on the More or High setting. After 3 minutes of heating, add the meat and sauté, stirring often for 2- 3 minutes, until just lightly browned on all sides. Remove to rest on a plate and set aside.
  2. Add the remaining 2 tablespoons of oil and let heat for 1 minute. Add the prosciutto (if using) and sauté for 90 seconds. Add the Worcestershire and deglaze (scrape) the bottom of the pot to make sure it’s free and clear of any browned bits. Add the shallots, mushrooms and garlic and sauté for 5-8 minutes until browned and fragrant. Add the whiskey (if using) and deglaze once more. Add the thyme and stir. Simmer for 5 minutes or until the liquid mostly evaporates.
  3. Add the broth to the pot and stir well. Return the beef and just nestle so it’s mostly in the broth. Secure the lid, move the valve to the sealing position, and hit Keep Warm/Cancel followed by Manual or Pressure Cook on High Pressure for 30 minutes. When done, allow a 10-minute natural release followed by a quick release.
  4. While the meat is pressure cooking, pre-heat the oven to 400-425° and bake the frozen puff pastry shells or thawed puff pastry disks according to package instructions (keep an eye on them as all ovens vary).
  5. Stir in the Dijon (if using) and pâté until combined into the sauce (see Jeffrey's Tips).
  6. Make a slurry by mixing together the cornstarch with 2 tablespoons cold water until smooth. Hit Keep Warm/Cancel and then hit Sauté and Adjust so it’s on the more or high setting. Once bubbling, add the slurry while constantly stirring. After 30 seconds of bubbling, hit Keep Warm/Cancel to turn the pot off.
  7. Gently ladle the filling into the puff pastry shells (or if you cut out rounds in pastry sheets, poke a hole in the top and gently mix around the flaky center so it crumbles to the bottom of the pastry and it's hollowed out - ready to spoon the filling in). Goes perfectly with my Aligot or Garlic Mashed Potatoes.

Jeffrey's Tips

Be mindful not to oversalt your Wellington! I don’t call for salt in this recipe because the diced prosciutto and pâté provide plenty on their own. If not using the prosciutto, feel free to add some seasoned salt just before serving to taste (start with 1/4 teaspoon and work your way up). Do bear in mind that all pâtés vary. Some have plenty of salt and all are rather rich, so you can start by adding 4 ounces and, once you taste the final product, you can feel free to stir in up to 4 more ounces if desired.

You will have enough filling for 12 (or more) puff pastry shells - so you can also use thawed puff pastry sheets and cut the dough (or any scraps of the dough if using instead of the shells) into 1-inch squares and bake with the shells for additional scooping or garnish.

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