Egg Drop Wonton Soup

Egg Drop Wonton Soup

In addition to Christmas, it’s pretty customary for a Jewish family living on Long Island to have Chinese on Sunday nights. My dad would often order take-out from a charming place called Sun Ming in Huntington that looked like a palace, was two-stories high and had an amazing Tiki-style lounge. While Sun Ming no longer stands (and that makes me so sad), they had the best Egg Drop and Wonton soups. Now seeing as my dad could usually never decide upon the two, he often combined them into what is commonly known as Egg Drop Wonton Soup. This super simple recipe I have come up is truly representative of the best of them. Not only is it the perfect consistency, loaded with wontons and egg ribbons coursing through the soup, but it boasts vibrant colors to match its deep flavor.

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Egg Drop Wonton Soup

Cooking The Broth

Chicken broth being poured into Instant Pot
Begin by pouring some broth in your Instant Pot (you can also do this on your stove though. See Jeff’s Tips in the recipe card below).
Spices being added to broth
Add some ground ginger, seasoned salt, and garlic powder to the broth…
Sesame oil added to Instant Pot
…along with some sesame oil.
Stirring broth before pressure cooking.
Stir until well-combined. If you wish to add some frozen corn kernels, you can do that now as well. Secure the lid and cook at high pressure.

Preparing The Eggs

6 eggs: 3 with their egg whites and yolks in a bowl and 3 with just their egg whites being separated from the yolks, with the yolks not being used
Meanwhile, as the soup’s cooking, let’s focus on our eggs. The saying goes not to put all your eggs in one basket, and that holds true here (except we’re using a bowl, not a basket). We will use 6 eggs total: 3 kept whole with their egg whites and yolks and 3 with JUST the egg whites and no yolks. You can easily separate them with an egg white separator and save the 3 yolks in an air-tight container in the fridge for a few days to use for breakfast, carbonara, a cake – anything you wish!
Whisking eggs in bowl
Lightly beat the eggs and set aside.

Preparing the Cornstarch Slurry

Water and cornstarch in two separate bowls.
A cornstarch slurry which will be the perfect thickening agent for our soup once done being pressure cooked. Take equal parts cold water and cornstarch…
Mixing the water and cornstarch together to form a slurry
…and mix them together to form a slurry. Set aside.

Post-Pressure Cooking Touches

Adding scallions to the pressure cooked soup.
Once the soup is done cooking, bring the pot to a bubble. Add some sliced scallions…
Adding turmeric to the soup.
…and turmeric, which not only gives it a beautiful, yellow hue, but is also a great anti-inflammatory!
Stirring the soup.
Stir until everything is combined.

Adding The Wontons

Adding frozen wontons to the soup
Now we’ll take some wontons, be it freshly made or your favorite frozen ones…
Allowing the wontons to simmer in the soup until cooked
…and add them to the soup, allowing them to cook in the simmering soup for a few minutes.

Thickening The Soup

Stirring the cornstarch slurry into the soup so it thickens
After the wontons are cooked, stir in the cornstarch slurry.
Thickened soup with the heat turned off and the bubbles dying down.
Allow it to bubble for a few moments and you’ll see it instantly thicken into the perfect consistency! Turn the pot off.

Egg Dropping

Adding or dropping the beaten eggs to the soup
Once the bubbles begin to die down, take the beaten eggs and a large serving fork
Using a large serving fork to comb through the egg white which forms egg ribbons.
…and as your pour the beaten eggs into the soup, use the fork the gently rake the egg through the soup. This is where the soup gets it’s name by the way – we’re “dropping” the eggs into the soup!
The finished soup
Beautiful egg ribbons will form instantly! Allow it to cook through for just a minute and then this soup will be ready to serve! If you want to, you can taste it and feel free to add more seasoned salt and even some optional white pepper for spice, if desired.

The Taste Test

Soup in bowl with Chinese noodles and additional scallions
Ladle some into bowls and top with additional scallion and Chinese noodles, if desired.
Man with a spoonful of soup looking very excited.
A soup so simple and quick to make is one that you’ll be proud to stare at on your spoon.
Man trying soup.
Give yourself a moment of instant comfort and gratification.
Man looking content with soup.
I mean, if you don’t get satisfaction out of combining the flavors of juicy wontons swimming in a bowl of egg drop soup, call Mick Jagger.
Man's father tries soup
But, truth be told, this recipe wouldn’t mean anything unless it got the seal of approval from one VIP: my dad! (Granted, I called him in from laying out in the sun to try this so his face is slathered in lotion).
Man and his father looking happy.
And just like that, this Egg Drop Wonton Soup is instantly Chinese-American food-loving Jewish dad from Long Island approved! And it’s so easy, even a non-cook like him can make it whenever the mood strikes.
Yield: 4

Egg Drop Wonton Soup

Egg Drop Wonton Soup

In addition to Christmas, it's pretty customary for a Jewish family living on Long Island to have Chinese on Sunday nights. Now seeing as my dad could usually never decide upon the two, he often combined them into what is commonly known as Egg Drop Wonton Soup. This super simple recipe I have come up is truly representative of the best of them. Not only is it the perfect consistency, loaded with wontons and egg ribbons coursing through the soup, but it boasts vibrant colors to match its deep flavor.

Prep Time 2 minutes
Cook Time 3 minutes
Additional Time 15 minutes
Total Time 20 minutes

Ingredients

Instructions

  1. Add the broth, seasoned salt, ground ginger, garlic powder, sessame oil, and corn (if using) to the Instant Pot. Secure the lid, move the valve to the sealing position, and hit Manual or Pressure Cook at High Pressure for 3 minutes. Quick release when done.
  2. Hit Cancel and then Sauté and Adjust so it's on the More or High setting. Add the scallions and turmeric. Once the soup begins to bubble, add the frozen wontons and then let them cook for 5 minutes (regardless if they were frozen or fresh). Then add the cornstarch slurry and stir for another minute until the soup has thicken (see Jeff's Tips on the soup's thickness level).
  3. Hit Cancel to turn the pot off. Once the bubbles begin to die down, simultaneously pour in the beaten eggs with one hand while gently raking the eggs through the soup with a large serving fork in the other hand (a larger-sized dinner fork can also be used). Almost immediately, you'll see beautiful egg ribbons form in the soup! Do this for about 1 minute, until the eggs are cooked through.
  4. Taste the soup. If you find it could use a little more seasoned salt, stir in a few sprinkles until you're happy. And if you want it a bit zesty, add some of that optional white pepper!
  5. Ladle into bowls and top with additional scallions and perhaps some Chinese noodles, if you desire.

Jeffrey's Tips

This egg white separator is great, cheap, and a must-have in your kitchen!

I like pressure cooking this soup as I feel it infuses the spices and sesame oil into the broth in a special way, but you can also totally make this on your stovetop instead of the Instant Pot! Simply follow all the Steps as is, but just bring the soup to a simmer in a pot on the stove, slightly covered, for about 10 minutes before moving onto Step 2.

You can make my wontons here if you have the time! If not, use your favorite frozen brand from found in the freezer section of most general markets, and especially Asian markets!

I suggest 1 1/2 - 2 pounds of wontons for 6 cups for broth, but you can really use how many you wish (I just wouldn't exceed 2 pounds so it doesn't dominate the soup too much.

You can keep this vegetarian by using veggie-only wontons or dumplings and vegetable or garlic broth.

For a thinner soup, start with 2 tablespoons each of the cornstarch and water for the slurry. If after stirring in Step 2 you decide you want it thicker, then add another tablespoon of each.

Reader Interactions

Comments

  1. Jeffery Edwards

    This recipe is super simple and easy to follow. Plus the tips you added for reference are great. This is a must have item when I order Chinese and now I can make it at home. I just picked up some shrimp wontons from Costco yesterday and I’m ready to begin this culinary adventure!

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