Instant Pot Southern Stew

Instant Pot Southern Stew

Living with a person hailing from the South (Alabama to be exact) taught me a lot of things about cooking and the Southern staples that go along with it. Since it is winter at the time of this recipe’s creation, I am pulling out all the stops and giving you a stew loaded with Southern goodies such as a holy trinity (pepper, onion and celery), collard greens, black-eyed peas, pork sausage and, of course, ham broth thanks to Better Than Bouillon Ham Base (which eliminates the need for a ham hock). Welcome to what I call Southern Stew. It’s like my Sausage & Spinach Soup, but Southernized!

This post was sponsored by Better Than Bouillon/Summit Hill Foods.

Watch The Video!

Instant Pot Southern Stew

Prepping the Broth with Better Than Bouillon

Jar of Better Than Bouillon Ham Base
It starts with some Better Than Bouillon Ham Base.
Base being scooped out of jar
Scoop some out…
Base being added to water in measuring cup to form ham broth
…mix it into some water and PRESTO! Instant Ham Broth!

Sauté Away

Bacon grease added to Instant Pot
Let’s get cookin’! In true Southern form, reserved bacon grease from breakfasts’ past will come in handy here. If you have some, add some to your Instant Pot (or you can use vegetable oil in its place)…
Butter added to pot
…along with some butter (NOTE: you can also double the butter if not using the bacon grease or oil). Give the pot some heat.
Melted and heated bacon grease and butter in pot
Once melted and bubbling…
Adding diced celery, onion and bell pepper to pot
…add what Southerners call the “holy trinity” comprised of diced bell pepper, onion and celery to the pot.
Sautéing veggies
Sauté for a few minutes until softened.
Adding two tubes of pork sausage to pot
Now it’s time to get meaty! Add some tubes (or “chubs”) of any variety of pork sausage to the pot…
Sautéing sausage until crumbled and browned
…and sauté until it’s crumbled and lightly browned.
Adding chopped collard greens to pot
Building on our Southern touches to this stew, we’ll add some chopped collard greens…
Stirring collards until wilted into the sausage and veggies
…and sauté into the sausage and veggies until wilted.
Adding sherry wine to pot
Add some sherry or a dry white wine to the pot…
Adding ham broth to pot
…along with that ham broth we made earlier, which also eliminates the need for a ham hock! (NOTE: If not using wine, add another cup of broth here).
Adding seasonings to pot
Add a few basic seasonings (see the recipe card below to see exactly what they are)…
Adding rinsed and drained black-eyed peas to pot
…and to round out our Southern staples, some canned black-eyed peas that we’ve rinsed and drained!

Under Pressure

Stirring everything in pot
Give it all a good stir and pressure cook.

The Post-Pressure Cooking Touches

Adding cream after pressure cooking the stew in pot
When done pressure cooking, we’ll put on the finishing touches with some heavy cream.
Stirring in the cream
Stir it in and watch the magic happen!
Skimming off excess sausage oil layer from stew in pot
While the oil from cooking the sausage will add additional rich flavor and color to the stew, I realize not everyone is into that. Feel free to skim some off with a ladle either now or before adding the cream.
Adding Creole/Cajun/Louisiana seasoning to pot
Lastly, give a final Southern kiss with some Creole/Cajun/Louisiana seasoning.
Stirring soup with ladle
Give it all a final stir, ladle some up…
Ladled stew in bowl
…and serve in bowls alongside some biscuits or cornbread for dunking!

The Taste Test

Man with bowl of stew
Now just look at this beautiful Southern Stew you’ve created!
Man sharing bowl with Southern gentleman
The proper thing to do in this case is to serve it to a native Southerner (hi, Richard)!
Southern gentleman trying stew
Once they try it…
Southern gentleman enjoying stew
…their face should look like this.
Southern gentleman looking happy and holding biscuit next to stew
And this stew is officially Southerner approved – so long as the biscuit or cornbread is there alongside it!
Yield: 6

Instant Pot Southern Stew

Instant Pot Southern Stew

Living with a person hailing from the South (Alabama to be exact) taught me a lot of things about cooking and the Southern staples that go along with it. Since it is winter at the time of this recipe's creation, I am pulling out all the stops and giving you a stew loaded with Southern goodies such as a holy trinity (pepper, onion and celery), collard greens, black-eyed peas, pork sausage and, of course, ham broth thanks to Better Than Bouillon Ham Base (which eliminates the need for a ham hock). Welcome to what I call Southern Stew. It's like my Sausage & Spinach Soup, but Southernized!

Prep Time 10 minutes
Cook Time 5 minutes
Additional Time 10 minutes
Total Time 25 minutes

Ingredients

  • 2 tablespoons reserved bacon grease or vegetable oil (see Jeff's Tips)
  • 2 tablespoons (1/4 stick) salted butter (see Jeff's Tips)
  • 1 medium yellow onion, diced
  • 3 ribs celery, diced
  • 1 large green bell pepper, diced
  • 2 pounds pork sausage of your choice (the kind in a tube also known as a “chub” - make sure it's thawed if you got it frozen)
  • 16 ounces (1 pound) collard greens, chopped with hard center stalks discarded (see Jeff's Tips)
  • 1 cup of sherry wine or a dry white wine (like a Sauvignon Blanc)
  • 5 cups of ham broth (add 1 more cup of broth if not using the wine)
  • 2 teaspoons Italian seasoning
  • 1 teaspoon onion powder
  • 1 teaspoon garlic powder
  • 1 teaspoon seasoned salt
  • 1 teaspoon black pepper
  • 2 (15.5-ounce) cans black-eyed peas, rinsed and drained
  • 1 cup of heavy cream or half & half
  • 1-2 teaspoons Creole/Cajun/Louisiana seasoning (I use Tony Chachere’s)
  • Hot sauce, for serving

Instructions

  1. Add the bacon grease (or oil) and butter to the Instant Pot. Hit Sauté and Adjust so it’s on the More or High setting. Once the melted and bubbling, add the "holy trinity" that is the onion, celery and bell pepper and sauté for 5 minutes until softened.
  2. Add the sausage and break it down with a wooden spatula/mixing spoon. Sauté for another 3-5 minutes, until crumbled and lightly browned.
  3. Add the collards. It will feel like a lot at first, but as you stir them into the sausage and veggies for 1-2 minutes, they will wilt down significantly. (NOTE: So you don't overcrowd the pot, you can add the collards in two batches. Once the first batch is wilted, add the second batch and stir until also wilted).
  4. Pour in the wine and let simmer for 1 minute. Follow with the broth, Italian seasoning, onion powder, garlic powder, seasoned salt and black pepper.
  5. Lastly, add the rinsed and drained black-eyed peas and stir. Secure the pressure cooking lid, hit Cancel and hit Pressure Cook or Manual at high pressure for 5 minutes. Quick release when done.
  6. You may see a thin layer of oil from the sausage after stirring the pressure cooked stew. The oil creates a richer flavor and color but I realize not everyone wants that. If you wish to skim off some of the sausage oil at the top of the stew, feel free to do so with a ladle and discard.
  7. Stir in the the heavy cream and the Creole seasoning (start with 1 teaspoon and you can add more to taste).
  8. Ladle into bowls and serve with a few dashes of hot sauce and/or some biscuits or cornbread, if desired.

Jeffrey's Tips

Reserved bacon grease is pretty common in many Southern households. It's simply the grease after cooking bacon that's been cooled, poured into a mason jar and stored in the fridge for future use. If you prefer not to use (or don't have) any reserved bacon grease or oil, you can use 4 tablespoons (1/2 stick) salted butter in its place. Or, if you don't want butter, you can use 1/4 cup of bacon grease or vegetable oil instead.

You can sometimes find collard greens already chopped in bags in the produce section. And, if you aren't into collards, feel free to sub the same amount of spinach, kale or escarole in its place.

If you can't find Better Than Bouillon Ham Base, you can also use any of their other flavors and add a ham hock just before pressure cooking at the end of Step

Reader Interactions

Comments

  1. Richard Bujaki

    Jeffery, In case you were not aware of it. You can now buy a tub of Bacon Grease in most supermarkets. The product is called, Bacon Up. It’s shelf stable or refrigerate after opening. I cook with it all of the time.

  2. Dianne

    Greetings from Alabama! First I never post reviews, but this soup is awesome! Southern comfort in a bowl! Don’t skimp on the hot sauce 😉

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